Women's Divorce Blog

  • Facebook and Divorce – Proceed with Caution
    Not only can social media contribute to the breakup of a marriage, it can also impact your divorce as well. Here’s why you should avoid social media before and during your divorce.
  • Who can file as Head of Household?
    Many divorced parents don’t understand the rules regarding filing as “Head of Household” when doing their taxes. Keep reading to find out what they are.
  • Best Way to Sell an Engagement Ring after Divorce
    After a bad marriage and a bad divorce, many women are ready to get rid of this symbol of eternal love. These tips can help turn your bridal bling into money.
  • Allow Yourself to Heal
    Denying the emotional pain of divorce by trying to avoid it or push it away can actually extend the time it takes to heal. Instead, allow yourself time to work through the grieving process.
  • 9 Ways to Make Visitation after Divorce Easier
    Newly divorced parents have a lot of adjustments to make, but ultimately they want to ease the pain for their children. Here are some tips to help take the sting out of visitation.

Life After Divorce?

The hurt and disruption caused by a divorce can make you question whether there can be life after divorce. How can I pick up the pieces and how good will the quality of life be after a divorce?

Depression after your divorce

  • Depression is an illness
  • Genetics can play some role
  • Can be triggered by major life events including divorce
  • Get professional help
  • Depression can be successfully treated

Depression is an illness

Depression is an illness and is not temporarily feeling "blue". Symptoms include 

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, being "slowed down"
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Appetite and/or weight loss or overeating and weight gain
  • Thoughts of death or suicide; suicide attempts
  • Restlessness, irritability
  • Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders, and chronic pain


Statistics

In any given 1-year period, 9.5 percent of the population, or about 20.9 million American adults, suffer from a depressive illness1.

Some types of depression run in families, suggesting that a biological vulnerability can be inherited. Not everyone with the genetic vulnerability will develop the disease suggesting that additional factors play a role.

People who have low self-esteem, who consistently view themselves and the world with pessimism or who are readily overwhelmed by stress, are prone to depression. Whether this represents a psychological predisposition or an early form of the illness is not clear.

A serious loss, difficult relationship, financial problem, or any stressful (unwelcome or even desired) change in life patterns can trigger a depressive episode. Very often, a combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors is involved in the onset of a depressive disorder. Later episodes of illness typically are precipitated by only mild stresses, or none at all.

Divorce is a highly stressful life event. This can trigger depression by itself or the stress from subsequent pressures such as parenting alone or financial problems can act as the trigger.

Depression is not something you can shake off or think your way out of.

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